Tag Archives: African American

Ramad Chatman to Spend 5 More Years in Jail Despite Being Found NOT GUILTY

Ramad Chatman (24) will spend an additional 5 years in jail despite being found NOT GUILTY for armed robbery.

According to The Independent, in 2012 Chatman, age 19, was convicted of breaking and entering for stealing a television worth $120. It was his first offense and Chatman was sentenced to five years’ probation. Chatman abided by his probation by attending all meetings, completing community service, and keeping a steady job. Then in 2014, a clerk who had been robbed in a convenience store identified him as a suspect in the crime one year after the event.

Chatman saw that his face and name were circulating for a crime that he did not commit. As part of his probation he had to submit his whereabouts to law-enforcement officials monthly. To clear his name, Chatman turned himself in. Judge Jack Niedrach was very adamant about sending Chatman to jail based on the clerks testimony. As some know, the justice system is very flawed and many young black men and women are encouraged to take plea deals to obtain a cleaner record or receive less time; Chatman tried this but the deals were rejected.

As a result, Chatman went to trial and was found NOT GUILTY because there was no evidence that he had committed the crime.

Judge Jack Niedrach did not care.

Niedrach revoked Chatman’s probation and resentenced him for his original 2012 crime.

If Chatman hadn’t been arrested for the convenient store robbery, he would have finished his probation and his record would have been clear in July 2017. He was sentenced because turning himself in broke the probation. He turned himself in because he wanted to CLEAR his name! The judge is a RACIST PIECE OF SHIT who wanted to make an example of Chatman. He saw that Chatman was trying to do right after his crime but did not care. These are the type actions that make someone delve back into crime and feel like they have nothing to lose. Please SHARE this story and info so that Ramad Chatman can receive some justice!

Advertisements

Dear White People Review: Episode 1

Film Synopsis

Dear White People was first released in 2014 as a film directed by Justin Simien. The story followed four black students as they attended a predominately white institute named Winchester University. Each character represented a different perspective on what it meant to be black in a majority white space and each handled racism differently in a post-Obama country. The protagonist, Sam White, was a bi-racial, pro-black, film major with a provocative campus radio show entitled, Dear White People. The films main plot was Sam’s pursuit to become president of the black student occupied dorm, Armstrong Parker, and her fight against the integration of the dorm. Troy was the son of the Dean and the golden boy of the campus. Coco, short for Colandrea, was a bougie student from the Southside of Chicago who aspired to be the next reality TV star and Lionel was the gay, nerdy, black journalist who was too black for the white students and too white for the black students. Between Sam’s task to save the dorm house and Lionel being caught in the middle of the drama, a blackface party ensues and shit hits the fan on the campus. It is revealed that the party invite was not sent out from the racist magazine group, Pastiche, but in actuality was set up by Sam.

dear-white-people

The Netflix series returns where the party left off. Sam, Lionel and some of their friends crash the party, while Troy arrives with the cops, and Coco shamely defends the students for being able to be black for one night.

Chapter 1

The episode opens with the blackface party and the crash that follows. The camera pans around the chaotic scene to land on our protagonist, Sam and her handy dandy vintage camera. Sam is a junior studying film and the host of the controversial radio show, Dear White People. Many students listen to the show including the group behind the racist satirical campus magazine, Pastiche. In response to the party, Sam opens up with what the student body is allowed to wear to a Halloween party and what not to wear which is simply, “me” as in black face. This was the scene that was used in the date announcement trailer along with photos of white students dressed in black face and stereotypical “black” attire. This simple request in a fictional series enraged people so much that the YouTube video currently has 57,361 up votes and 420,728 down votes! Unsurprising comments of, “What if there were a, Dear Black People?”, and “I’m unsubscribing from Netflix”, fill the page which is odd because I thought most of these sensitive white people unsubscribed when Luke Cage was released. There is more outrage from the title of the series and not the fact that college students AND adults are still doing black face every year, crazy right?

170208095938-dear-white-people-image-exlarge-169

Sam’s best friend Joelle is introduced. She is played by the lovely Ashley Blaine Featherson who I was introduced to on the web-series, Hello Cupid. In the film, she was more of a side character but in the series she gets a deserving boost; I guess. It would be nice to see more of her story in season 2. Joelle comes off as the contradicting comic relief. She’s “woke” but watching, “some white bitch from Texas”, on how to be waist thin and ass phat. Sam reassures her that she is fine and states “is white bitch her name?” She also describes the guilt of re-watching the Cosby Show sitcom following the accusations which Sam deems a conspiracy because “Cosby was in route to purchasing NBC”. Right. It’s clear they have a fun relationship even though their focus does not always align.

Screen Shot 2017-05-07 at 10.27.07 PM

Then we see Reggie (heart eye emoji). I liked his character from the movie. He was serious in his fight against racism but let Sam lead the efforts which can be seen as admirable or a tad bit immature. Soon after, Sam is seen having sex with who we assume is Reggie but it is actually Sam’s secret white bae, Gabe.  Gabe is a T.A. in one of Sam’s classes; he’s is a little more scraggly/hippie looking compared to the clean cut Gabe from the film. He doesn’t seem as much of a condescending asshole as the films character instead he comes off as a carefree kind of guy. After their session, Sam gets ready to leave for a Black Caucus meeting. Gabe wants to come with but we know how this goes; Sam cannot be seen with Gabe or it will diminish her pro-black persona.

dear-white-people-7.w710.h473

When Sam arrives to Armstrong Parker for the meeting she is greeted by Lionel Higgins, a writer for the student newspaper, Winchester Independent. She begins to describe the four different black student unions at Winchester University. This is similar to the scene in the film where Sam describes the different type of black students at the university, the oofta, nose job, and “keeping it 100”, black student. Out of the four groups, there’s Sam’s group, the Black Student Union; they’re a good medium between aggressive action and organization. The African American Student Union (AASU) who is said to not contribute anything and consists of Kelsea, a super bubbly and naïve student, and Cordell, the resident pastor. There’s the Black American Forum (BAF) consisting of mediocre slam poets who throw great parties; picture dashikis, ankh necklaces, and fist in the air; hashtag stay woke! The last group lead by Troy Fairbanks (who interrupts Sam’s introduction) is the Coalition of Racial Equality (CORE). Think future black leaders of America. This group also includes Coco which is short for Colandrea. Coco was her way of sounding less “urban” than Colandrea. I wonder what her middle name is.

dear_white_people

As they are discussing the blackface party and how to take action, Coco’s phone chimes. A sinister look appears across her face as she begins to tag others in the post. While Sam is talking about the incident, everyone starts to look at their phones in shock. Sam stops and looks at her phone to see a photo of her sitting on Gabe’s bed, clothed with the caption, “hate it when bae leaves”. Scandalous! My mouth dropped. This was so disrespectful and violating. After the meeting, Sam finds her friends and Coco chatting about the photo. She and Joelle have a discussion about her secret bae. Joelle is frustrated that her best friend didn’t tell her and that he is white. She reminds her of how they met in the comment section of her article entitled, “Don’t fall in love with your oppressor”. Through all of this, Joelle gives Sam a reassuring hug of forgiveness and acceptance.

074_DWP_101_Unit_01145R-960x640

Joelle’s honesty about her feelings with Gabe’s race was realistic. Everyday black women who are in interracial relationships get side-eyes but black women who are super pro-black get the ultimate side eye (and so do men). It doesn’t make one unauthentic when they date interracially but it can be a tad disappointing especially when there’s men like Reggie who are ready to give someone like Sam the world. The heart wants what it wants; we shouldn’t force someone to be with someone they don’t want to be with.

Later, Sam talks to Gabe about the photo in which he apologizes for but also replies with, “I’m only a millennial on paper”, which is hilarious. Anyone in their late 20’s to mid-30’s can relate to this. Sam invites Gabe to a viewing party at Armstrong Parker. This is their first time being seen in public and specifically being seen at the black student occupied dorm. She questions his laid back attire, suggesting he wear some “jays”, in which he replies, “Are you trying to My Fair Lady me for your black friends?” I haven’t seen this movie but I understood the joke. In general the series has a ton of film and TV references that if you’re not up on you’ll miss the joke entirely. Gabe’s question is fair. Does Sam want him to be something’s he’s not? So, they go to the dorm where they’re met with some side-eyes and a little shade from Joelle. They watch a parody of the hit show Scandal which is entitled, Defamation. It is hilarious and even though I’ve never been to a public screening of a show, I feel this was a realistic depiction of how black students come together to watch what some consider quality TV and some consider garbage.

9fbe61dd4e6b5c7a_Screen_Shot_2017-05-02_at_4_05_16_PM

After the show ends, the black face incident is brought up. Gabe puts his foot in his mouth with the classic white liberal response of, “I can’t believe this is happening in 2017” and “I’m just as pissed as you”. Reggie’s not having it; he responds with, “It’s like you and I attend two completely different schools”. Which is very true. Gabe can try to relate but he will never know what it feels like to be black in America even if he attended an HBCU it still wouldn’t be the same. Gabe questions whether Reggie will hit him which is entirely absurd. He and Sam leave the screening where Gabe argues that he was uncomfortable, Sam replies with “Welcome to my world”. Gabe acknowledges this but states that he would never make Sam feel uncomfortable with his friends. Meh, I can see how he could be disappointed but at the same time, he needed to hear what Reggie was saying. There is a problem at the school let alone the entire world when it comes to racism so instead of responding with tired phrases, he should have asked how he could help or support groups fighting against these issues.

Screen Shot 2017-05-07 at 10.31.29 PM.png

After the convo, Lionel pulls Sam aside to tell her that the newspaper has evidence that someone else other than the group behind Pastiche sent out the invite; basically giving her a chance to confess instead of allowing the paper to break the news. The next day Sam arrives at her radio station to find her slot replaced with a show entitled, “Dear Abigail”. She rushes in to bump Abigail off the air and give the white students a piece of her mind. She eloquently states why her radio show is not racist compared to the actual racism that is plaguing black American schools, neighborhoods, and well being. She also reveals that she was the one who sent the invite for the blackface party and that she “considered it a sociological experiment” that the students passed with flying colors. She ends it with an apology to her bae, Gabe.

Overall

The first episode was a great recap of where the film ended plus the aftermath of the party. Logan Browning, as Sam is ok to me. She doesn’t play as commanding as Tessa Thompson did in the film; she’s somewhat laid back. This could be because the film was shorter, the personalities had to play bigger so since Sam’s story is stretched out in the series, she’ll have to tone it down a bit. Lionel and Coco’s characters were also re-casted but I’ll talk about them in their individual chapters. The cinematography and dark neutral colors were great. The introduction of each chapter for the students was creative as well. I love the set design of Sam’s room and the clothing worked perfectly for each character especially the different BSU groups. The writing for the different BSU groups and the screening of Defamation represents the type of specifics that can only come from black writers. It’s so realistic and detailed; it adds an extra layer of believability to the show. All of the haters who have or had something to say about the title should watch the show and pay attention to the last scene. This scene perfectly sums up why Sam has her radio show and why we need a series entitled, Dear White People!

Neon Fade Burning Sands Review (SPOILERS)

My first movie review for 2017 and in general will be for the 2017 film, Burning Sands. This review contains spoilers.

Plot

burning-sands-netflix

Burning Sands is the feature length directorial debut from Gerard McMurray and is distributed through Netflix. The film is about 5 young men who are experiencing, “Hell Week” the final week in the pledging process for a fictional black fraternity at an HBCU. The boys go through extreme and abusive hazing in their journey to become members of the prestigious fraternity. The protagonist, Zurich, is played by rising actor, Trevor Jackson. Zurich’s father had pledged in the past but later dropped before he could cross over so it seems that Zurich is fulfilling what his father could not finish. As the hazing process intensifies and starts to affect Zurich’s body, relationship, and school work, he starts to question the process and how bad he really wants it.

Now, I didn’t pledge nor did I have the desire to pledge so my knowledge of black Greek life is small. I’ve seen School Daze which was one of the first films, maybe even the first to bring black Greek life to the forefront in the 80’s and I like many others have heard stories about the extreme hazing and the mistreatment as well as the brotherhood/sisterhood and support for the community. I saw the trailer before watching the film so I knew this would be a dark film.

Visuals

null

Pros:

I could tell the cinematography would be amazing from the trailer alone. The aerial shots of the campus and the bodies of water were smooth and gave a sense of the rural location. My favorite scenes in particular were the intro of the pledgees in the woods, the pool scene, and the entrance into hell night. The shot of the pledgees running to get in formation moved perfectly and set the mood for the film; the green and the black were very vivid. The water level cinematography in the pool scene matched the erratic feeling. The scene where the guys enter the barn for the hell night was intense as well. Again, I could feel it even in the trailer. The way the camera went from still to shaky as it followed behind the guys added that level of chaos that followed. A lot of the tracking shots from behind reminded me of the film, Moonlight. It placed the viewer right along the journey with the protagonist.

Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 10.54.15 AM

Cons:

Some of the scenes were a tad bit dark specifically the party scene and the scene where the guys were confronted by the cops in the woods. I felt like it added a sense of realism but at the same time some of the actors got lost in the sauce with all that lovely melanated skin. During the party scene, I thought the tracking shot that followed Rotimi’s character right before the line dance (?) lingered for a little while.

Music/Sound

632695556

Pros:

I was actually surprised at some of the copyrighted songs that were featured. I didn’t think the film was going to use current popular songs. Ju Ju on that Beat is my little guilty pleasure but the original beat, Knuck If You Buck, got me hyped. I can literally listen to that song every week and still love it. As I read on Twitter, that scene was a little unrealistic because most claimed the fraternities stroll to this song at any given moment. Then, my song Wicked came on! It’s not a party until some Future is played. From what I’m learning, the stroll to Down for My Niggaz, is also a common thing for fraternities. Rapper, Common also contributed an original song entitled, The Cross, which features Lianne La Havas. This came in at the credits after a very emotional moment and it was very fitting. As far as sound goes, the pool scene stood out to me. The thud of the water mixed in with the muddled voice-overs blended very well.

I have no cons about the music

Characters/ Acting/Writing (Toss up of Pros and Cons)

Burning Sands

All of the actors had great performances. Kudos to the line brothers for staying in those menacing characters. It takes a lot of vulnerability and patience to play these characters especially the pledgees. In a way, the actors had to go through the same hazing rituals as their characters did and what I heard in an interview, some of them were actually hit with some real blows.

I would like to personally thank the casting director for choosing the beautiful Trevante Rhodes and all his deliciousness for this film. I loved that his character was included because it gave a sense of normalcy that was missing from the other big brothers. He teetered between going along with the hazing tradition and stepping in when some things got out of hand. My only issue was the inconsistency of his authority. He seemed to stand his ground in the shower scene against Big Country but lost all authority in the paddling scene so that was a little confusing.

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 11.43.56 PM

Zurich

Burning-Sands

I think Trevor Jackson did very well as the protagonist. He was able to transition from his laid back demeanor to the fraternity sets in a snap. His delivery in the last shot perfectly captured the emotion of the tragic ending. Zurich’s lack of urgency and common sense was a bit much. I understand that he is young but he made a lot of stupid mistakes that he and his line had to ultimately pay for (they would have probably went through it anyway so idk). He didn’t have as much growth as I thought he would.

My biggest issue is the fact that Frank had actual growth that was missing from Zurich. In the beginning, he made it known that he didn’t have or want a brotherhood with the rest of his line brothers. As the film progressed, he changed and ultimately sacrificed his life for his brother which was devastating.

Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 12.00.02 AM

The Line Brothers

I understand that the film is not going to dig too deep into all 5 of the line brother’s lives but I would have loved to see more from the Christian pledgee. He literally had around 5 lines. I thought the scene with Toya could have been a perfect moment to show the pressure of sex for his character. This could have highlighted another extreme action that many young men have to endure.

Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 11.15.03 AM

The Women

The women in the film were just meh to me. The sorority girl, Angel, was very unnecessary; she seemed intrigued by Zurich but it went absolutely nowhere. Her little dance scene with him was awkward and she showed how delusional she was for thinking he wanted her. Alfred Woodard’s character, Professor Hughes, was ok. I liked that she showed support without beating him over the head but I felt something was missing. I would have liked to have seen a conversation between her and Dean Richardson as they seemed to have different views on pledging.

Zurich’s girlfriend, Rochon, was beyond annoying. I get it, you want to spend time with your man but it’s literally a week! It would have been nice if she worried more about the bruises on his stomach and why he was having difficulty breathing but her character took a cliché narrative. The only thing I could think of is that she was completely oblivious to what pledges have to go through. At one point, she asks, “What do they have you doing?” So, maybe she didn’t understand that he had to be attentive at any point of the day for his frat.

Jackson-and-Hakim

Now, Toya. Toya, Toya, girl. Right off the back, I was annoyed by her intro as the black girl popping gum with a slight attitude. I don’t know how many times I’ve seen this but it’s getting old. At first she comes off as a thirsty groupie but her scene with Zurich showed she had some depth, I guess? I don’t really find using the word “noble” mind blowing but the scene was funny. My biggest issue with this scene is her nonchalant attitude about the sex with the whole line. I think it’s fine to be sexually free but the film ignores the mistreatment and more than likely rape that happens to women during this process. I understand that there are tons of women who are ready to do whatever for the attention of the frat but I feel the film could have explored the concept of women being pressured or forced into having sex with these men. Maybe the director didn’t want to add anymore negative images of the frat life or maybe he didn’t want to emulate that pivotal scene from School Daze.

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 11.56.42 PM

Other Issues

My main issue with the film was the overall goal of Zurich. From the look of the trailer, I thought throughout the process he was going to finally taking a stand to the harsh treatment of the hazing. At one point, Professor Hughes tells Zurich that he should lead his brother’s from the underground back to where his fraternity was meant to be. This line should have been introduced earlier and ultimately been the goal of Zurich. He grew to an extent by telling his line brothers that they were worth more and should change the future of the hazing tradition but it fell flat when he continued to hell night. This could possibly open a door for a sequel. Another note, I understand the concept of, “We come from Kings and Queens”, in the context of how people of African descent have been treated in America. We have to use different methods to uplift our people but at the same time with every King and Queen came thousands of workers, peasants, and even slaves so we might want to use a different method.

Another issue I had was understanding some of the fraternity language and actions. I didn’t understand what being on the yard meant. Maybe it’s just me. I didn’t know what GDI was until Angel broke it down. Also, the relationship with the big brothers outside of the college was confusing. At first, I thought they were members of their family who happened to pledge but then I realized these were mentors who were part of the fraternity.

Overall

The visuals, acting, and music of the film were great. The casting made sense. Some of the female characters needed more depth or should have been excluded altogether. The same goes for some of the big brother’s who put them through hell. The growth of the protagonist could have been fleshed out better. The ending was very emotional and brought a sense of realism to the film. I think that this film is very important in hopefully putting an end to the extreme hazing issues across all fraternities and organizations outside of college. Hopefully, no current pledges are getting it worst because of the film. I think Gerard McMurray and all involved made a great piece and I hope to see more from him if he’s still breathing after the backlash of the film.

My rating for this film: 7/10

7 Black Cultural Events in Baltimore to Attend this Black History Month

Check out these great events in Baltimore to attend in honor of Black History Month!

Asante Celebration

16300126_1426262890719262_7609471645383868812_o

Who: The Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle

What: A Celebration for supporters of the grassroots organization LBS and newcomers alike.

Where: The Living Well – 235 Holliday St, Baltimore, MD 21202

When: February 20th at 6pm

Notes from the organization:

The LBS Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle (LBS) is a grassroots think-tank which advances the public policy interest of Black people, in Baltimore, through: youth leadership development, political advocacy, and autonomous intellectual innovation.

The Asante Celebration will be hosted by The Living Well on February 20th at 6pm. There will be free food, and open bar, performances and music by DJ Sundiata. All the proceeds from the event will directly support our grassroots work in Baltimore.

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door and the dress code is casual attire.

13268146_10209799263037962_754824715031519025_o-766x570.jpg

Buy Black Ujamaa Marketplace

u

Who: NSAA African Creations By Majorie Nicole

What: A Marketplace for Black Owned Businesses 

Where: St. Frances Academy Community Center – 501 E. Chase Street Baltimore MD 21202

When: February 19th at 12-4pm (Grand Opening)
3/19 Marketplace
4/16 Soul Sunday (spoken word & soul food)
5/21 Marketplace

Notes from the Organization:

Come out and connect with the communuty in a family friendly environment infused with culture including a drum circle, ujamaa education, musical performance, kids activity, qigong health demonstration, a DJ, food, dessert and more. This community event is free to the public and all are welcome.

15965598_1833315030213483_8659759586520988903_n

7th Annual Johns Hopkins Black History Month Student Competition

his

Who: The Creative Alliance and John Hopkins

What Art Competition by Baltimore Public School Students 

Where: The Creative Alliance at the Patterson: 3134 Eastern Ave, Baltimore MD 21224.

When: February 25 through March 11, 2017

Notes form the Organization:

Students from kindergarten through twelfth grades create mixed-media works to depict the history of African Americans specific to Baltimore City. All entries are awarded cash prizes in support of their school’s arts programs, courtesy of the Johns Hopkins East Baltimore Community Affairs Office. Young people, families, teachers, and community members are invited to view exhibition together at Creative Alliance’s Amalie Rothschild Gallery from February 25 through March 11, 2017.

size_550x415_marquee-revision-sketch-jed

I Am Not Your Negro

neg

Who: The words and interviews of James Baldwin, directed by Raoul Peck 

What: Documentary entitled, I Am Not Your Negro

Where: The Charles Theater – 1711 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21201

When: How ever long it’s showing

Frederick Douglas-Isaac Myers

zzdata-douglas_myers_20.jpg

Who: The history of Frederick Douglas and Isaac Myers

What: An educational and national heritage site that highlights African American maritime history.

Where: 1417 Thames St. Baltimore, MD 21231

When: All Day, Everyday

Notes from the Organization:

Come and share with us as we chronicle the saga of Frederick Douglass’ life in Baltimore as an enslaved child and young man. We also take a look at the life of Isaac Myers, a free born African American who became a national leader. As a visitor, you will also learn about the founding of the Chesapeake Marine Railway and Dry Dock Company and the establishment of the African American Community in Baltimore during the 1800’s.

zzdata-douglas_myers_10.jpg

VERIZON BLACK HISTORY MONTH OPEN HOUSE 2017

permanent-exhibition

Who: Reginald F. Lewis Museum

What: Museum of Maryland African-American History and Culture

Where: Reginald F. Lewis Museum, 830 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD

When: February 25, 2017

Notes from the Organization:

Celebrate Black History Month with an open house at the museum. Visit the galleries for free. In addition, enjoy craft workshops, live performances, and more. Sponsored by Verizon.

NAMYANKA BLACK HISTORY MONTH PROGRAM

 15972405_1192824904087952_3429845772702316476_o

Who: Namyanka Performing Arts Training Center

What: A Tribute to Black Broadway Musicals

Where: Coppin State University, Johnson Auditorium – 2500 W. North Ave, Baltimore Md 21216

When: February 26, 2017

Cost: $15.00

The Full List of Winners at The 48th Annual NAACP Image Awards

The 48th annual NAACP Image Awards honored the best in film, television, music, and literature. There were little to no surprises for this years winners including Anthony Anderson for Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series and his co-star wife, Tracee Ellis Ross for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series. Taraji P Henson won for the second time in a row for Outstanding Actress in a Drama series, Denzel Washington won Outstanding Actor for his role in Fences, and Queen Sugar won for Outstanding Drama Series which was a nice surprise. Some amazing actors and actresses were not in attendance including Mahershala Ali who won for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture and Viola Davis who won Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture.

The honorable Chairman’s Award was given to professor, author, and founder of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, Charles J. Oletree Jr. and the NAACP President’s Award was given to educator, historian, and founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History, Lonnie Bunch. Outstanding Motion Picture went to Hidden Figures and Entertainer of the year went to Dwayne Johnson, who is rarely in attendance to this award show. Everyone knows this should have went to Beyoncé, who was also snub last night at the Grammy’s but that’s another article. Check out the full list of the winners below.

 

The Chairman’s Award: Charles J. Ogletree Jr.

NAACP President’s Award:  Lonnie Bunch

Entertainer of the Year: Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson

Outstanding Motion PictureHidden Figures

Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture: Taraji P. Henson, Hidden Figures

Outstanding Drama SeriesQueen Sugar

Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series: Anthony Anderson, Black-ish

Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series: Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us

Outstanding Comedy SeriesBlack-ish

Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series: Taraji P. Henson, Empire

Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series: Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish

Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture: Denzel Washington, Fences

Outstanding New Artist: Chance the Rapper

Outstanding Male Artist: Maxwell

Outstanding Female Artist: Beyoncé

Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration: “Freedom,” Beyoncé feat. Kendrick Lamar

Outstanding Jazz Album: Latin American Songbook, Edward Simon

Outstanding Gospel Album (Traditional or Contemporary): One Way, Tamela Mann

Outstanding Music Video: “Formation,”  Beyoncé

Outstanding Song (Traditional): “I See A Victory,” Kim Burrell and Pharrell Williams

Outstanding Album: Lemonade, Beyoncé

Outstanding Song (Contemporary): “Freedom,” Beyoncé feat. Kendrick Lamar

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series: Laurence Fishburne, Black-ish

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series: Tichina Arnold, Survivor’s Remorse 

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series: Jussie Smollett, Empire 

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series: Naturi Naughton, Power 

Outstanding Television Movie, Limited-Series, or Dramatic Special: The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Outstanding Actor in a Television Movie, Limited-Series, or Dramatic Special: Courtney B. Vance, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story

Outstanding Actress in a Television Movie, Limited-Series, or Dramatic Special: Regina King, American Crime

Outstanding News/Information (Series or Special): BET Love and Happiness White House Special 

Outstanding Talk Series: Steve Harvey

Outstanding Reality Program/Reality Competition Series: Iyanla: Fix My Life

Outstanding Variety (Series or Special): 2016 Black Girls Rock

Outstanding Children’s Program: An American Girl Story – Melody 1963: Love Has to Win 

Outstanding Performance by a Youth (Series, Special, Television Movie or Limited-Series): Marsai Martin, Black-ish

Outstanding Host in a News, Talk, Reality, or Variety Program (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble: Roland S. Martin – NewsOne Now with Roland S. Martin 

 

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture: Mahershala Ali, Moonlight

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture: Viola Davis, Fences

Outstanding Independent Motion PictureMoonlight

Outstanding Documentary (Film)13TH

Outstanding Documentary (Television)Roots: A New Vision

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series: Kenya Barris, Black-ish

Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series: Ava DuVernay, Queen Sugar

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Television): Charles Murray, Roots–Night 3

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Film): Barry Jenkins, Moonlight

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series: Donald Glover, Atlanta–Value

Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series: John Singleton, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story–The Race Card

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Television): Rick Famuyiwa, Confirmation

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Film): Barry Jenkins, Moonlight

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance (Television or Film): Idris Elba, The Jungle Book

 
Outstanding Literary Work (Fiction): The Book of Harlan, Bernice L. McFadden

Outstanding Literary Work (Nonfiction): Hidden Figures, Margot Lee Shetterly

Outstanding Literary Work, (Debut Author): Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood, Trevor Noah

Outstanding Literary Work (Biography/Autobiography): Born A Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood, Trevor Noah

Outstanding Literary Work (Instructional)The Power of Broke: How Empty Pockets, a Tight Budget, and a Hunger for Success Can Become Your Greatest Competitive Advantage, Daymond John, Daniel Paisner

Outstanding Literary Work (Poetry): Collected Poems: 1974-2004, Rita Dove

Outstanding Literary Work (Children): Tiny Stitches: The Life of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas, Gwendolyn Hooks, Colin Bootman

Outstanding Literary Work (Youth/Teens): As Brave As You, Jason Reynolds

The Jackie Robinson Sports Award: LeBron James

 

17 Films and Series to Watch in Honor of Black History Month

In honor of Black History Month, check out my list of films and television series celebrating and exploring black life throughout history including captivating documentaries, quality biopics, and recent theatrical releases. Remember to celebrate Black History beyond these short 28 days!

 

I am not your Negro (2017)

neg

The potent words of writer, activist, and playwright James Baldwin on race still rings true decades later. This 2017 documentary, directed by Raoul Peck and narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, explores race throughout the years and visualizes Baldwin’s words about close friends, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Medgar Evers. Look for this film in your local theaters or local art house.

African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates, Jr (2013)

37299

Follow scholar, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. as he ventures back in time to discuss the history of African-Americans from the Transatlantic Slave Trade to the Civil Rights era to the Nations first black president.

Black in Latin America with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (2011)

bl

Henry Louis Gates Jr. travels south to explore the largely hidden history of black Latin Americans. Through interviews and discussions in countries, Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico and Peru, Gates tackles issues of race, colorism, and the slave trade that still affects the black community in the present.

Paris is Burning (1990)

tumblr_mkfgr8zjzh1qins52o1_400

The birthplace of, “throwing shade” and O-P-U-L-E-N-C-E. Paris is Burning is an early look at the underground LGBT scene centered on fashion, sex appeal, and voguing. Created by people of color, this film delves into the energetic scene and how class, family, and illness affected young gay people of color in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

Hidden Figures (2016)

hf

This blockbuster hit was deserving of its $100 million earnings at the box office. The film tells the seldom heard story of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson, the three black women who were the brains and strength behind the US sending a man to space.

The New Edition Story (2017)

ne

BET and the creators of The New Edition Story took their time with this amazing biopic. The 3 part miniseries follows the iconic group from their humble beginnings in Orchard Park projects to their most successful sold out tours. The series doesn’t sugar coat the intense drama that went on behind the scenes, detailing financial rip-offs, drugs, and physical altercations between the members. The acting, story, and of course the music are all on point.

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011)

movieposter

A cultivation of found footage and interviews of Angela Davis, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farrakhan and others associated with the black power and anti-war movements, all from the perspective of Swedish journalist and filmmakers.

The 13th (2016)

tumblr_oe60haWvbT1u3awlbo8_500.gif

Ava Duvernay explores America’s exploitation of the 13th amendment and how policies throughout time have disproportionately targeted black men and women in America.

Dark Girls (2011)

cropped-dark-girls-header

A discussion and stories about colorism and how it immensely affects the lives of black women across the nation.

Barry (2016)

barr

Follow Barack Obama as he enters Columbia University to world of self discovery, love, and perseverance.

What Happened, Miss Simone? (2015)

tumblr_inline_noqebxoofv1ql2nmd_500

Unapologetic, talented, and beautiful describes Nina Simone. Through vintage interviews, performances, and stories from her family and friends, you’ll learn the vibrant yet dark story of the legendary artist.

Queen of Katwe (2016)

queen-of-katwe4

Based on a true story, Queen of Katwe follows 10 year old Phiona as she overcomes huge hurdles to become a world chess champion.

Chisholm ’72: Unbought & Unbossed (2004)

chi

Shirley Chilsom was not only the first black woman elected to Congress but the first African American and first woman to run a high profile campaign in the US! Watch as she challenges sexism, racism, and patriarchy in this untimely piece.

 

Unsung and Unsung: Hollywood (2008-present)

Unsung opens the door to all the trials and tribulations of some of America’s most talented but underrated black artist. Debarge, Xscape, Big Daddy Kane, The Whispers, Yo-Yo, David Ruffin, and Al B Sure are just some of the artist who have been documented on the show. Also, check out Unsung: Hollywood for stories on black actors, films, and series who were deserving of more recognition.

Madiba (2017)

madiba6

This six hour mini-series chronicles Nelson Mandela, played by Laurence Fishburne, and other leaders of the African National Congress who fought to end apartheid in South Africa.

Fresh Dressed (2015)

2015-10-22-1445526386-8569347-640_fresh_dressed

Remember Kangol hats and gold rope chains? What about Cross Colours? FUBU, anyone? Fresh Dressed digs up the influential contributions of black style throughout the years and the ups and downs of clothing brands that were for us and by us.

Race (2016)

race

Race, the story of American track star Jesse Owens, exemplifies courage and strength in the face of white supremacy. Not only did Owens battle racism in the US but he challenged and then crushed Hitler’s Aryan supremacy fantasy in 1930’s Berlin.

Unapologetic and Proud: Photos of Women of Color at the Women’s March on Washington

The Women’s March on Washington was a monumental event that not only filled the streets of our Nations capital but the entire country and world including Melbourne, London, Nairobi, Paris and Cape Town. People from different religious affiliations, sexual identities, and ethnicities attended the rally to address dark future of the upcoming presidency. Speakers included newly elected California senator, Kamalah Harris, Angela Davis, America Ferrera, Alicia Keys, Janelle Monae, Janet Mock, Scarlett Johansson, Van Jones, Michael Moore, and many more.

The diverse group of speakers addressed issues related to African Americans, police brutality, environmental issues, Native American rights, Hispanic American rights, the LGBT community, and more. What wasn’t so diverse were those in attendance. Majority of the 500,000 attendees were white women with pink hats that stereotypically represented women’s rights. I attended the march and felt like a true minority amongst all of these women. Between the, “I’m with her” signs and the “We are all equal” shirts, I wondered if these women really cared about the other women and men that are not only affected by this presidency but have been affected by sexism, racism, xenophobia, ableism and homophobia throughout their lifetime.

si

The diverse group of speakers addressed issues related to African Americans, police brutality, environmental issues, Native American rights, Hispanic American rights, the LGBT community, and more. What wasn’t so diverse were those in attendance. Majority of the 500,000 attendees were white women with pink hats that stereotypically represented women’s rights. I attended the march and felt like a true minority amongst all of these women. Between the, “I’m with her” signs and the “We are all equal” shirts, I wondered if these women really cared about the other women and men that are not only affected by this presidency but have been affected by sexism, racism, xenophobia, ableism and homophobia throughout their lifetime.

In this sea of white women, I managed to get beautiful photos of unapologetic women of color and other attendees at the historical march. Check them out below and visit http://www.womensmarch.com for more info on the event.

change

docu

 

Advertisements

Blerd, activism, music, and entertainment news